Nano-beaker array formation process and its use for high-throughput loading and crystallization screening and other lab-on-the-chip applications

Case ID:
11-1056

Wayne State University researchers have invented a novel process to make array patterns and its use for high-throughput screening of crystallization conditions, liquid solution applications, and other lab-on-the-chip applications.  The formation process is a variation of ?particle lithography? in which microparticles such as polystyrene microparticles are used as templates to make ring structures. 

Previous ?particle lithography? is based on organosilane surface chemistry.  It produces rings limited to the monolayer thickness by reaction of organosilane with silicon wafer substrates.  By controlling particular reaction conditions, the WSU research team was able to produce ring patterns that exceed the monolayer height.   Furthermore, different microparticles (e.g., silica particles instead of polystyrene particles) can be used to form the same pattern.  Microparticles with difference shapes (e.g., micro-rods instead of micro-spheres) can be used to make beakers of different shapes.   Different organosilanes (e.g., aminosilanes instead of octadecyltrichlorosilane) can be used to give different beaker chemical composition.   Thus, a variety of liquids that wet the beaker surface can be contained inside the beaker.  These technological abilities could fill a need for inexpensive test plates for drug loading, precipitation, and crystallization and also high-throughput chemical reaction tests with minimal amounts of liquid.

Commercial Applications:

·         The use of nanopattern arrays in the production of nano-beakers with adjustable beaker volume

·         High-throughput screening of crystallization conditions for drugs, dyes and pigments, and proteins

·         Liquid solution applications

·         Lab-on-the-chip applications

Competitive Advantages:

·         Simple and inexpensive method to produce nanopattern arrays with adjustable height (inner volume)

·         Ability to produce ring patterns that exceed the monolayer height

·         Different microparticles (e.g., silica particles instead of polystyrene particles) can be used to form the same pattern

·         Microparticles with difference shapes (e.g., micro-rods instead of micro-spheres) can be used to make beakers of different shapes.

·      Different organosilanes (e.g., aminosilanes instead of octadecyltrichlorosilane) can be used to give different beaker chemical composition

 

 

Patent Information:
For Information, Contact:
Nicole Grynaviski
Commercialization Principal
Wayne State University
nicole.grynaviski@wayne.edu
Inventors:
Guangzhao Mao
Daniel Sobczynski
Sunxi Wang
Eugene Xhahysa
Pedram Jahanian
Keywords:
Nanotechnology